WORLDS FASTEST Aircraft US Air Force SR-71 Blackbird Mini Documentary

A great Mini Documentary video on the world famous US Air Force aircraft the SR-71 Blackbird that was used for observation flights over the Soviet Union.
BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.–Twenty-six years ago today, Beale said goodbye to the fastest air-breathing jet in the world, the SR-71 Blackbird.

The Blackbird was an advanced, long-range, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft that called Beale Air Force Base home from January 1966 to January 1990.

But for Master Sgt. Floyd Jones (ret.) and a local group of former Blackbird maintainers, the mission continues, not with turning wrenches, but with the same elbow grease.

"It's not glamorous but it needs to be done," said Jones, who worked on the Blackbird for nearly 20 years.

Floyd and members of The Blackbird Maintainers group wash and scrub down the SR-71 periodically to ensure the static display is looking its best.

"It's a beautiful aircraft," said Master Sgt. (ret.) John Olp, a 10-year Blackbird veteran. "But some of the local wildlife prefer to roost on it."

Local birds, weather, wind and dust are all contributing factors that lead to the Blackbird getting an occasional bath.

"We try not to let it get too dirty," Jones said. "We take a pressure washer to it and scrub it down, it takes a couple of hours but we have a goodtime with it."

In addition to the Blackbird Maintainers, the 9th Maintenance Squadron intermittently performs spot cleaning on the aircraft.

Jones said that for many former maintainers it's just another way to reconnect with fellow servicemen and trade "war stories" about the Air Force and the aircraft they enjoyed working on.

"It's a rare plane," Jones said. "We have to take care of it for future generations to cherish."

Developed in secrecy by Lockheed's Skunk Works division in Palmdale, California, only 32 were built. None were ever lost to enemy action.

"This jet was ahead of its time," Jones said. "We all love this aircraft and none of us mind taking care of her into the retirement years."

Video Description Credit: Staff Sgt. Robert Trujillo

Thumbnail Credit: TSgt. Michael Haggerty Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate

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WORST NIGHTMARE for Russian Military !!! US Navy X-47B stealth aircraft

The US military X-47B UAV will serve the US navy well and will be the worst nightmare for the Russian military. The Northrop Grumman X-47B is a demonstration unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations.
The US Navy has successfully catapulted a prototype drone from an aircraft carrier on Tuesday, which is the first step in a program designed to begin fielding drones on all Navy carriers between 2017 and 2020.

The flight serves as a milestone for the future of drone aviation, and US Navy officers have celebrated the success of its launch. But the flight of the unmanned aircraft, which is the size of a fighter jet, is likely to become the subject of criticism from those who believe drone usage hurts the US image – especially since drones are behind many civilian deaths on foreign grounds.

Critics have already condemned the Navy’s $1.4 billion drone prototype program, relaying their concerns over the development of weaponized systems in which humans will have even less control over when it comes to launching attacks.

Human Rights Watch has particularly protested the development of drones that carry weapons and are fully autonomous, like the X-47B unmanned aircraft that the Navy launched from the USS George H.W. Bush on Tuesday. This unmanned aircraft can reach an altitude of more than 40,000 feet and has a range of more than 2,100 nautical miles, the Associated Press reports.

This model is particularly valuable because it has the capability to take off and land on an aircraft carrier. Developing such drones would allow the US to launch strikes from anywhere in the world, regardless of whether or not a foreign country allows the US on its grounds.

The drone is fully autonomous in flight, and relies on computer programs to direct it – unless an operator programs it to operate otherwise. Most drones currently employed by the military fully rely on operators to control it from a remote location.

While the X-47B is only intended for testing purposes rather than operational use, the Navy will use it for research purposes to develop advanced unmanned aircraft for use in future conflicts. When it comes to using lethal force, the X-47B still requires human approval. But Human Rights Watch believes the prototype research will lead to the development of drones that conduct deadly attacks with no human intervention.

Steve Goose, director of the arms division at Human Rights Watch, expressed some of his fears with AP.

“For us, the question is where do you draw lines?” he said. “We’re saying you need to draw the line when you have a fully autonomous system that is weaponized. We’re saying you must have meaningful human control over key battlefield decisions of who lives and who dies. That should not be left up to the weapons system itself.”

But despite fears over the future of fully autonomous drones that can launch deadly attacks from aircraft carriers, the Navy is hailing the flight of its prototype as a success it has long sought.

“US Navy history is made!” the Navy wrote from its official Twitter account. “Was airborne at 11:18A. More to come.”

The Navy plans to release videos and photographs of the event, which Read Adm. Mat Winter wrote marks “an inflection point in history on how we will integrate manned and unmanned aircraft on carrier flight decks in the future.”

Video Description Credit: Russia Today

Video Credits: Navy Media Content Services,Terry Turner, DoD News,Dustin Good, Defense Imagery Management Operations Center, Gregory WilhelmiSmall, Seaman Apprentice Travis Litke, 3rd Class Sade Lucas, 2nd Class Gregory Wilhelmi, Petty Officer 3rd Class Donald White, MC2 Chris Brown, Andrew Johnson, NAVAIR, 2nd Class Kristin Rojas and Northrop Grumman.

Thumbnail Credit: US Navy

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